Posted 1 week ago

finalfenrirsoldier:

I don’t know if it’s been done yet

Posted 1 week ago

It’s all coming together.

Posted 1 week ago

shutuptres:

ourvaluedcustomers:

While criticizing his friend…

Thanks.

Posted 1 week ago

christiancgtomas:

I was speaking out of irritation at the ignorant comments that were being made at Las Vegas’ First Black Film Festival, and someone I know made this lovely little comment so I had put my two cents in. Some arguments I made were grammatically unsound (that very last sentence, yikes), but whatevs. It’s 10 PM and I have to go to bed.

Posted 1 week ago

Gentrification is violence. Couched in white supremacy, it is a systemic, intentional process of uprooting communities… [Its] central act of violence is one of erasure.

…“Girls,” for example, reimagines today’s Brooklyn as an entirely white community. Here’s a show that places itself in the epicenter of a gentrifying city with gentrifiers for characters – it is essentially a show about gentrification that refuses to address gentrification. After critics lambasted Season 1 for its lack of diversity, the show brought in Donald Glover to play a black Republican and still managed to avoid the more pressing and relevant question of displacement and racial disparity that the characters are, despite their self-absorption, deeply complicit with. What’s especially frustrating about “Girls” not only dodging the topic entirely but pushing back – often with snark and defensiveness against calls for more diversity – is that it’s a show that seems to want to bring a more nuanced take on the complexities of modern life.

In an appallingly overwritten New York magazine article with the (I guess) provocative title “Is Gentrification All Bad?,” Justin Davidson imagines a first wave of gentrifiers much the way I’ve heard it described again and again: “A trickle of impecunious artists hungry for space and light.” This is the standard, “first it was the artists” narrative of gentrification, albeit a little spruced up, and the unspoken but the understood word here is “white.” Because, really, there have always been artists in the hood. They aren’t necessarily recognized by the academy or using trust funds supplementing coffee shop tips to fund their artistic careers, but they are still, in fact, artists. The presumptive, unspoken “white” in the first round of artists gentrification narrative is itself an erasure of these artists of color.

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

Saying things like “we’ve gone from white hoods to business suits” is one way to seem to speak to contemporary racism’s less vocal, yet still insidious nature. But it does a disservice to the public understanding of racism, and in the process undercuts the mission of drawing attention to contemporary racism’s severity.

It wasn’t the KKK that wrote the slave codes. It wasn’t the armed vigilantes who conceived of convict leasing, postemancipation. It wasn’t hooded men who purposefully left black people out of New Deal legislation. Redlining wasn’t conceived at a Klan meeting in rural Georgia. It wasn’t “the real racists” who bulldozed black communities in order to build America’s highway system. The Grand Wizard didn’t run COINTELPRO in order to dismantle the Black Panthers. The men who raped black women hired to clean their homes and care for their children didn’t hide their faces.

The ones in the hoods did commit violent acts of racist terrorism that shouldn’t be overlooked, but they weren’t alone. Everyday citizens participated in and attended lynchings as if they were state fairs, bringing their children and leaving with souvenirs. These spectacles, if not outright endorsed, were silently sanctioned by elected officials and respected members of the community.

It’s easy to focus on the most vicious and dramatic forms of racist violence faced by past generations as the site of “real” racism. If we do, we can also point out the perpetrators of that violence and rightly condemn them for their actions. But we can’t lose sight of the fact that those individuals alone didn’t write America’s racial codes. It’s much harder to talk about how that violence was only reinforcing the system of political, economic and cultural racism that made America possible. That history indicts far more people, both past and present.

Posted 1 week ago

krudman:

martyfun:

el-sato:

h-a-r-p-o:

Dan Fessler’s HD Index Painting Technique let’s you paint pixel art in Photoshop in a non-destructive manner, and lets you use pretty much every tool in a perfectly pixel-gradient fashion!

The article gives you everything you need to try it out for yourself.It’s easy to set up and use, and the results are so fucking cool.

pixel artists everywhere dying just so they can roll in their graves

wwwwwHHAAAT

ohhhhhh my goodness

Posted 1 week ago

shutuptres:

tnperkins:

giancarlovolpe:

A little behind the scenes look of the early stages of Green Lantern the Animated Series.

My eternal gratitude to everyone who helped prove the doubters wrong.

Nice, GC! Thanks for the backstory, my friend!

Always listen to Bruce Timm advice.

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

grimphantom:

typette:

lord-ponty:

Mako Mankanshoku has returned!

OMG MAKOOOOO

Grimphantom:

She even have a Guts XD.  Cutest Mako Cosplayer :D.

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

neilnevins:

Tumblr - April 2nd

Posted 1 week ago
Posted 1 week ago

gunjap:

MG 1/100 Banshee 最終決戦仕様 Destroy Mode固定ver.UC: Modeled by kohaneism. Photoreview Big or Wallpaper Size Images
http://www.gunjap.net/site/?p=167386